Sunday, June 13, 2010

Websites I found interesting (weekly)

  • The federal education program appropriated funds “based on good test scores in math, science, and reading,” she said, but it did not distribute money for history or civics. O¹Connor¹s new web site aims to right that wrong.

    Launched on May 24, is a rebranded, expanded version of an earlier site called “Barely one-third of Americans can even name the three branches of government, much less say what they do,” O’Connor said. “… I’m worried.” Games on iCivics include “Do I Have A Right,” in which the player runs a virtual firm specializing in constitutional law; “Executive Command,” which offers a chance to play president; “Supreme Decision,” about the Supreme Court; “Branches of Power,” which gives the player control of all three branches of government; and “LawCraft,” in which the player is a member of Congress. The iCivics program is based at Georgetown University Law School. O’Connor is the project founder and leads the board of the nonprofit iCivics Inc., iCivics spokesman Jeffrey Curley said. The project began in 2007 and is in use at schools around the country.

    tags: civics, socialstudies, government, icivics, interactive

  • allows teachers to perform routine tasks like recording attendance and grades. Schoology also provides a platform for giving tests and other assignments online. The social networking aspect of Schoology lies in the interface for posting messages to a large community (whole school), to a smaller community (an individual class), or to individual students. The Schoology interface will look very familiar to anyone that has used Facebook.

    tags: lms, CMS, web2.0, schoology, management

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

No comments: